Car importers getting to grips with new regulations

Despite initial hiccups, most of Vietnam's car firms are now complying with import rules that were tightened early last year, according to Deputy Prime Minister Trinh Dinh Dung.

The official made the comment at a conference to review the implementation of the Government's Decree 116 held in Hanoi last week.

Under the decree, which came into effect on January 1, 2018, auto importers were required to obtain vehicle type approval (VTA) certification from authorities in the exporting country.

This certification aims to ensure the origin, quality and value of the vehicle and often does not come from a state body but an authorised agency or association.

Dung said that after the decree came into effect, the businesses faced difficulties as they struggled to understand its regulations.

Their difficulties were eased after the Government directed the ministries of Transport and Industry and Trade to help explain, support and solve difficulties for automobile importers.

Up to now, most countries have provided VTA documents for imported cars into Vietnam. In fact, most cars imported from different markets have not yet met any difficulties and problems, said Dung.

To continue fine-tuning regulations on Vietnam's automobile sector, Dung said relevant sectors needed to promote the supporting industries via policy suggestions, especially for large investors.

Dung asked the Ministry of Transport to collaborate with concerned ministries and branches to continue working with automobile manufacturers, assemblers and importers to solve difficulties for enterprises.

He also directed relevant sectors to study, revise and supplement the auto checking process for technical safety and environmental protection. Dung also assigned the Ministry of Finance, in collaboration with ministries and sectors, to examine the localisation rate (local part supply rate) of imported automobile products into Vietnam from ASEAN countries.

In 2018, Vietnam imported more than 81,600 cars at a value of 1.8 billion USD, down 16.1 percent in volume and 19.8 percent in value compared with the previous year, according to the General Department of Customs. The decrease was said to be due to several barriers from Decree 116.

Source: People's Army Newspaper